Superstorm Sandy: What Do We Know?

Thank you for registering to participate in Clean Ocean Action’s Virtual Teach-In!  Please feel free to use the following pages listed as classroom resources.  To show your participation in teaching about Superstorm Sandy during the week of October 27th, please take photos of your class and send them to education@cleanoceanaction.org, or post them to Clean Ocean Action’s facebook, or Twitter!  (#cleanocean #virtualteachin).  Don’t forget to send us your feedback on the program and the materials below (email education@cleanoceanaction.org or call 732-872-0111).

 The resources below have been compiled as references to use in your classrooms.  While Clean Ocean Action did not create any of these lessons, we have tried to provide the most accurate and informative sources as possible.  Please keep in mind some sources may be from before Superstorm Sandy, but still give valuable information about the science behind the storm.  Some links may lead to additional sites that may not necessarily be suggested by Clean Ocean Action as a resource.
 Hurricane Sandy – Inside the Megastorm

  •  Grades 7-12
  •  A 54 minute PBS documentary that aired October 2, 2013. “Inside the Megastorm” takes viewers moment by moment through Sandy, its impacts, and the future of storm protection. Through first person accounts from those who survived, and from experts and scientists, “Inside the Megastorm” gives scientific context to a new breed of storms.

Source: PBS 

Eight Classroom Resources to Help Teach about Hurricane Sandy

  •  Multiple Age Groups
  •  This page gives a number of additional links and resources for teachers to find information on Hurricanes, extreme weather and specifically Hurricane Sandy

Source: The George Lucas Educational Foundation

Assessing the Damage from Hurricane Sandy

  •  Grades 5-8
  •  A New York Times webpage from October 29th, 2012 that quantifies and asses the immediate damage pertaining to Subways and buses, power infrastructure, tunnels, trains, airports, flooding, fires, and wastewater

Source: New York Times

A Disaster in the Making

  • **this lesson plan is from 2006 and does not include information on Sandy, but educators are encouraged to creatively incorporate Sandy into the discussion
  • Grades 6-8
  • An hour long lesson plan from the New York Times with videos and activities comparing and analyzing two natural disasters in United States history: the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and 2005’s Hurricane Katrina.

Source: New York Times

When Disaster Strikes

  • **this lesson plan is from 2006 and does not include information on Sandy, but educators are encouraged to creatively incorporate Sandy into the discussion
  • Grades 6-8
  • An hour long lesson plan from the New York Times accessing how major industries are affected by and respond to natural disasters particularly the impacts on infrastructure and economics

Source: New York Times

Eye on the Storm

  • **this lesson plan is from 2006 and does not include information on Sandy, but educators are encouraged to creatively incorporate Sandy into the discussion Grades 6-8
  • This 45 minute to one hour lesson has students look at how experts use historical data to predict storms and how industry uses that information to provide insurance coverage and preparedness plans

Source: New York Times

Blowing Through History

  • **this lesson plan is from 2006 and does not include information on Sandy, but educators are encouraged to creatively incorporate Sandy into the discussion
  •  Grades 6-8; 9-12
  •  In this hour long lesson plan from the New York Times, students explore Hurricanes in specific, looking at the characteristics of a hurricane and Hurricanes in US History

Source: New York Times

Hurricane Sandy: The Science Behind the Storm

  •  Grades 6-12
  •  A six page, two part outline describing weather patterns, timing, and environmental causes that led to the creation of Superstorm Sandy.  Followed by an activity that allows students to put storm data from 2012 into historical context

Source: The James Baldwin School for Expeditionary Learning, New York

 

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